Utterances.net edited by Jalel Harchaoui.
 
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Washington Persists in Its Illegal-Killings Campaign
More U.S. Drone Attacks: Pakistan is not Yemen
by Jalel Harchaoui.
Today, a U.S. drone strike in a tribal region of Pakistan killed anywhere between 6 and 9 suspects.
More U.S. Drone Attacks: Pakistan is not Yemen

The Obama Administration carries on the drone strikes begun under Bush II.

Today, a U.S. drone strike in a tribal region of Pakistan killed anywhere between 6 and 9 suspects. A few hours later, Pentagon spokesman George Little took that as an opportunity to remind the public of Washington’s commitment to the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution [ “no person shall be deprived of life without due process of law"; “innocent until proven guilty"; etc. ]. Indeed, with rigor and precision, the DoD official told the press: “Any time a bad guy has a bad day, that’s a good day for us. This [piece of news if confirmed] would be very helpful not just to the United States, but to our Pakistani partners and the Afghans, too.” Afghan officials don’t count; the current government in Kabul is a puppet regime; and the Western coalition forces’ occupation still hasn’t ended. Let’s look for “Washington’s partners” in Islamabad; what do they have to say? In a 2012 statement, Pakistan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs tried to be clear. He condemned Obama’s killings campaign as a violation of Pakistan’s sovereignty: “Such attacks are in total contravention of international law and established norms of interstate relations.” Apparently, “Washington’s partners” in Islamabad have difficulty expressing their approval in writing. Let’s turn to public opinion in Pakistan. On 06-Oct-12, Imran Khan, the chairman of the country’s fast-growing Tehreek-e-Insaf Party, led a 250-mile, 150-vehicle march of protest against Washington’s illegal drone attacks. That seems to suggest that Pakistan’s secular and liberal sectors of the population are deeply opposed to Obama’s clandestine-killings campaigns. Could it be that the Tehreek-e-Insaf Party is pro-Taliban? No; the Taliban accused Khan of being only a “slave of the West” and declared its hatred for Pakistan’s secular movement. Only possible conclusion: The Pentagon’s “partners” must hide so well and so secretly among the 176MM Pakistanis, they must verge on downright non-existence. Only the CIA’s counterpart favors illegal-slaughtering activity on Pakistani soil; that’s it.

In the mid-1980s, the Reagan administration considered Zia ul-Haq, Pakistan’s military dictator at the time, a friend and ally. Washington allowed ul-Haq to develop nuclear weapons and carry out a program of radical Islamization of Pakistan using Saudi funding and Saudi know-how (fundamentalist schools, etc.). The net result today is that Pakistan—a loose, divided, corruption-plagued, weak-sovereignty country—possesses 50 Hiroshima-type nuclear weapons (along with its U.S.-backed refusal to sign the non-proliferation treaty).

The Waziristan region hit today by the White House is located in the north-west part of Pakistan that is adjacent to Afghanistan. The border is porous and prone to infiltration (in both directions) by violent groups. As Washington persists in its illegal-killings campaign—as opposed to abiding by International and Domestic Laws—it is doing precisely those murderous groups’ bidding. The U.S. government is, by its own terrorist behavior, helping them recruit more and more educated individuals from non-fundamentalist pockets of the Pakistani population. Terrorism begets more terrorism; unconscionable violence without war begets more unconscionable violence without war. Always has; always will. It is only a matter of time until Reagan-approved nuclear weapons wind up in the hands of such uncontrollable cells. From there, it is quite easy to imagine what can happen in a U.S. city tomorrow. From a strictly selfish perspective—ignoring all laws and all moral principles—it is in the American population’s best interest to oppose and protest its government’s illegal-assassinations campaigns.

~ Jalel Harchaoui.